• HAPPY PRIDE MONTH ❤️

    LGBTQ+ people are beautiful and

     deserve to be loved and treated equally.  

  • LGBTQ+ Resources

    - The Trevor Project 

    https://www.thetrevorproject.org/
     

    The National LGBTQIA+ Health Education 

    https://www.lgbtqiahealtheducation.org/
     

    It Gets Better 

    https://itgetsbetter.org/
     

    - COLORS Youth 

    https://colorsyouth.org/
     

    - Trans Lifeline

    https://translifeline.org/
     

    Out & Equal

    https://outandequal.org/toolkits-guides/
     

    - Center South, LA

     
    https://centersouth.lalgbtcenter.org/
     

    Nami California 

    MENTAL HEALTH AND LGBTQI COMMUNITIES: CHALLENGES, RESOURCES, COMMUNITY VOICES 
     

    Click Here 

     
  • LGBTQ+ HISTORY

    3 IMPORTANT EVENTS 

    the stonewall riots

    1969 (June 27-29) – The Stonewall Riots, New York City. The Stonewall Inn is a gay bar in Greenwich Village in New York City. In response to an unprovoked police raid on an early Saturday morning, over 400 people, including gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and straight people protested their treatment and pushed the police away from the area.

     

    The tension from ongoing harassment galvanized the LGBTQ community to riot for six days. The protest through the streets of New York City is memorialized as the annual Gay Pride parades that are now celebrated around the world.

     

    Key people at the riots who went on to tell their stories were: Martha P. Johnson, Sylvia Rivera, Dick Leitsch, Seymore Pine and Craig Rodwell.

    The first gay pride marches

    1970 – The first gay pride marches were held in multiple cities across the United States on the first anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, including San Francisco and Los Angeles/ West Hollywood.

    Homosexuality is no longer declared a mental illness.

    In 1973 after years of studies, analysis, and changing cultural attitudes, the American Psychiatric Association’s board of directors removed homosexuality from the official list of mental illnesses, known as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, a move that was upheld with a vote by the association’s membership.

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